Author Archives: My Name Is Not Sir

About My Name Is Not Sir

Reading and Writing Therapy

My Name Is Not Sir

March 27, 2020

The present perfect

Level

CEFR B1 – Trinity Grade 5 – Cambridge First Certificate

What is it for?

It is used to link past to present when the result of the action is more important than the time it happened ..

1. When something started in the past and is still going on – “I have lived a thousand years.”

2. When the time period has not finished – “More than 3,000 migrants have died crossing the Mediterranean this year.”

3. To talk about actions repeated a number of times in the past – “I have died multiple times.”

4. To talk about recent things – “I’ve just seen a ..”

5. When the time of the action is not known or not as important as the action itself – “I have been to the mountain top.”

How is it constructed?

My God, what have I done?

Use ‘have’ (or ‘has’) and the past participle of the main verb.

For questions, invert the auxiliary verb (‘have’ or ‘has’) with the subject pronoun: “My God, what have I done?”

In the negative, put ‘not’ (or  ‘n’t’) after the ‘have’ or ‘has’: “I haven’t died yet.”

Things to remember

Is it ‘have’ or ‘has’?

There are regular and irregular past participles.

Pronunciation and spelling of the past participle.

never and ever , since and for , just, already and yet.

Why is it difficult?

Some languages use it differently so the meaning can be confusing.

There’s a bit to remember in its construction.

Answer this

What’s the closest you’ve ever come to death?

Follow up with

Maps through your Bones and Skin

Lizard in the Luggage

A Walk In The Park

Other tenses

The past simple

The present perfect continuous

My Name Is Not Sir

March 4, 2020

Trained initially to teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at International House, London, I developed teaching and learning techniques and strategies along with classroom management skills based on a humanistic and communicative approach to language learning.

I have worked in EFL teaching, teacher training and centre management posts in Europe and Central and South America, supporting learners to achieve Cambridge and Trinity ESOL and EFL qualifications.

Most recently I have been a Trinity College, London International ESOL Examiner Panel Member examining in Europe, South America and Asia.

My Name Is Not Sir exists to provide bespoke programmes for centres looking to develop the English skills of both students and teachers through innovative strategies and techniques to engage and motivate all participants.

Programmes can be anything from a single day or week to more extensive residencies of a month or longer.

Go here to make contact about EFL and ESOL Support with My Name Is Not Sir.

My Name Is Not Sir

March 4, 2020

Trinity GESE Grade 5. The holy grail ..

CEFR B1.1

“The true elementary level.” (6 / 12)

Structure

A 10 minute, 1:1 interview with a Trinity examiner.

1. Greetings

  • Say hello and show your ID. Give the examiner a copy of your topic form for the topic phase.
  • Make eye contact with the examiner.
  • Smile.
  • Answer the examiner’s introductory questions.
  • Listen to the examiner’s description of the exam.

2. Discussion

(Up to) 5 minutes discussion on a topic chosen by the candidate.

  • The examiner asks questions and makes comments on at least four points from the topic form to facilitate a spontaneous discussion.
  • The candidate must ask the examiner at least one question.

  • Pick a topic you are really interested in that is different from your classmates.
  • Make sure you do your research and have lots of things to say about your topic.
  • Make sure you know a wide range of vocabulary related to your topic.
  • Ask questions to the examiner about your topic.
  • Listen to the examiner’s questions carefully so that you make natural, appropriate contributions that incorporate language of the grade.

Avoid

  • Memorising / Recitation. You will not pass if you do this!

3. Conversation

(Up to) 5 minutes conversation on 2 subject areas chosen by the examiner from the following list:

A 1:1 genuine exchange of information, ideas and opinions.

4. Thank you and goodbye

4. Phonology

My Name Is Not Sir

March 4, 2020

My Name Is Not Sir – Passport saying Michael Andrew Lynch

Seeking to use my time where there is value and purpose, where my experience, skills and personal qualities can be utilised and extended and where my professional ideals, centred on personalised teaching and learning, innovation, creativity, professionalism, integrity, social engagement and community cohesion are shared.

I deliver and participate in sessions, workshops, programmes and residencies worldwide.

Go here to make contact.

Go here for information on remuneration.

My Name Is Not Sir

March 4, 2020

Trained initially to teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at International House, London, I developed teaching and learning techniques and strategies along with classroom management skills based on a humanistic and communicative approach to language learning. This training led to EFL teaching, teacher training and centre management posts in Europe and Central and South America.

I have supported learners to achieve Cambridge, IELTS and Trinity ESOL and EFL qualifications.

Go here to make contact about EFL and ESOL Support with My Name Is Not Sir.

My Name Is Not Sir

March 4, 2020

This page is currently being updated with new information and resources.

Bespoke sessions or series of sessions are available on all aspects of language, literacy and skills development teaching and learning across the curriculum.

Go here for any inquiries